blog

Not Your Typical Happy Ending

We’ve heard many people talk about “happy endings” at the end of a massage. Shady massage “parlors” are to blame, as places that use massage as a cover-up for their illegal activities. The practice not only gives the ancient art of massage a bad name, it leads to quite a few uncomfortable moments when legitimate massage therapists are surprised by quick-draw clients who assume all massage is of the parlor variety.

As a spa that likes to do its job well, we wanted to address this issue and tell you about all the legitimate benefits of massage.

Massage is technically considered alternative medicine, but many studies have been done that reflect very real changes in the well-being of the massage recipient. Which is to say, that by the end of a massage, you might find that:

  • Your anxiety levels have dropped.
  • You have less lower back pain than when you started.
  • You have less pain from osteoarthritis.
  • You sleep better.
  • Your blood pressure has declined.
  • If you received massage for an injury, you have less pain while healing.
  • You will have a stronger immune system to fight off diseases.
  • You feel less depressed than when you came in.
  • You have less likelihood of getting a migraine.
  • You have reduced PMS symptoms.
  • You have increased alertness for the rest of the day.
  • If you are receiving cancer treatment, many negative side effects have been ameliorated.
  • You have healthier, younger-looking skin.
  • Have increased joint flexibility.
  • Your muscles will recover faster when receiving a massage post-workout.
  • You feel happier, due to increased serotonin and dopamine in your brain.

With a roster like that, it’s no wonder that people seem to be so happy walking out of our massage studio!

Resources:
http://annals.org/article.aspx?articleid=747008
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2006/12/061212091936.htm
http://www6.miami.edu/touch-research/AdultMassage.html
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S027322970500033X
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18315504